Wow, I got 2 things to move at the same time.

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(Kiosud. 2010) Shark attack. Retrieved 16 March, 2013 from http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/1054660/
Phase 1 Introduction to Scratch as a programming environment
Phase 2 Extension project work with Scratch
Describe activity: By dragging blocks from the blocks palette to the scripts area, you are giving instructions (command sequences) to the sprite (animal) on the stage area. This activity developed to commanding the sprite to draw regular polygons, then to programming a simple racing car game and ping pong ball game.
As extension project work with Scratch, I found a more complex program on the internet (duly acknowledged) and created this to further develop my skills.
During Phase 1 and 2 of this course, I learnt that Scratch offers an opportunity to teach young children how to program a computer and create games. The thought processes involved collaborating in the planning, design and creation of a computer application. By using Scratch, children can improve their digital literacy as well as computer programming skills. Children learn how to control Scratch by using all the essential programming constructs like, sequencing, conditional branching, control structures and data manipulations.
Scratch programming involves IT skills and the creation of a typical application might involve:
• Drawing a sprite within the Scratch application.
• Importing a background picture from a photograph or a file created in another graphics application.
• Recording a sound file or incorporating an MP3 file into the application.
• Adding text with different fonts to an application.
• Moving sprites around the screen with turtle graphics commands.
• Manipulation and digital effects on graphics objects.
In linking these activities to the Australian Curriculum: Technologies, the activities will develop students who:
• are creative, innovative and enterprising when using traditional, contemporary and emerging technologies.
• effectively and responsibly select and use appropriate technologies, materials,
information, systems, tools and equipment when designing and creating socially, economically and environmentally sustainable products, services or environments.
• critique, evaluate and apply thinking skills and technologies processes that people use to shape their world, and to transfer that learning to other technology situations.
• individually and collaboratively plan, manage, create and produce solutions to
purposeful technology projects for personal, local, national and global settings.
• engage confidently with and make informed, ethical decisions about technologies
for personal wellbeing, recreation, everyday life, the world of work and preferred futures. (ACARA, 2013)

I have learnt through my activities with Scratch, that key skills such as problem solving can be learnt through programming. Programs are a set of instructions that a computer must follow to perform the task, whereby you can’t miss a link or it won’t work.

Scratch can be used in the lower grades (years 2-4 where students design and implement simple visual programs with user input and branching) (ACARA, 2013 p.71) of a primary classroom during maths lessons, where students control how the sprite moves by manipulating the x and y axis positions. For literacy, science and history/geography studies, the subject matter of the students’ creations can be geared toward the respective disciplines which would still provide students with the opportunity to learn the required curriculum but also incorporate the technology strand. Re-enactments of historical events and stories could be designed in Scratch. In an art class, students can design their own sprite and manipulate their appearance.
Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian curriculum: Technologies. Retrieved 15 May, 2013 from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

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My introduction to SCRATCH as a programming environment

My goal in this part of the course EDP4130, Technology Curriculum and Pedagogy, is to become familiar with digital media.  Scratch builds upon the long tradition of Logo, but takes advantage of new computational ideas and capabilities to make it easier for students in the primary school classroom (and me) to get started with programming and to extend the range of what students (and me) can create and learn. 

This digital technologies component  will address the “computational thinking and associated concepts” component of Technology in the Australian National Curriculum (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority, 2013).

Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian curriculum: Technologies.  Retrieved 11 March, 2013, from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

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DEECD%20iPad%20support%20booklet%20for%20special%20education.pdf

See on Scoop.itDigital technologies to assist students with speech and language disorders to achieve curriculum communication goals.

Russell Webb‘s insight:

A booklet produced by the Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development – has suggested applications and activities.

 

For example:

 

Communication and Assistive Technology Apps

Reading Apps

Writing Apps

See on www.ipadsforeducation.vic.edu.au

Apps for Speech and Language Development | The Spectronics Blog

See on Scoop.itDigital technologies to assist students with speech and language disorders to achieve curriculum communication goals.

Whether you are a parent, teacher or therapist, often each of us, in some way, is helping to improve the speech and language skills of students/children. So many children…

Russell Webb‘s insight:

The Applications provide students with the ability to interact with words with all their senses.  They can listen, see, touch and record while developing their vocabulary, language, articulation and grammar skills.

See on www.spectronicsinoz.com

SpecialEducationApp.pdf

See on Scoop.itDigital technologies to assist students with speech and language disorders to achieve curriculum communication goals.

Russell Webb‘s insight:

Produced by the Northern Territory Education Department – lists Apps suitable for early childhood, primary and secondary students.

Each App details teaching strategies/activities, quality teaching practices, assessment opportunities, national curriculum links and a rubric.

See on www.education.nt.gov.au

Novita Children’s Services – Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC)

See on Scoop.itDigital technologies to assist students with speech and language disorders to achieve curriculum communication goals.

Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) is explained. Detailed explanations are provided about the variety of different AAC systems available and how they are used by Novita speech pathologists.

Russell Webb‘s insight:

A very detailed web site clearly explaining how AAC helps students, gives examples of children who may be assisted by AAC and details types of AAC available.

See on www.novita.org.au